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Delayed diagnosis of bladder cancer in a patient with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease


1 Department of Medical Oncology, The Cancer Institute Hospital of Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo; Departmentof Medical Oncology/Hematology, Kakogawa Central City Hospital, Hyogo, Japan
2 Departmentof Medical Oncology/ Hematology, Kakogawa Central City Hospital, Hyogo, Japan

Correspondence Address:
Hirotaka Suto,
Department of Medical Oncology, The Cancer Institute Hospital of Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, 3-8-31, Ariake, Koto, Tokyo 135-8550
Japan
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None

DOI: 10.4103/jcrt.jcrt_1310_22

Approximately 50% of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) patients have gross hematuria, but few cases of bladder cancer complications are known. We report a case of a 49-year-old female ADPKD patient with bladder cancer, who was presented to our hospital 4 months after the onset of gross hematuria. A computed tomography (CT) scan showed a bladder mass, enlarged pelvic and left inguinal lymph nodes, multiple liver cysts, and a polycystic kidney. Based on family history, CT scan results, and lymph node biopsy, we diagnosed the patient with uroplakin III-negative bladder cancer with squamous metaplasia and ADPKD. The patient was treated with systemic chemotherapy but died 2 months after the definitive diagnosis. The delayed diagnosis was disastrous, and malignancy should be considered in the differential diagnosis when symptoms suggestive of malignancy such as hematuria appear. Particularly, uroplakin III-negative advanced bladder cancer has a poor prognosis and requires early diagnosis and treatment.


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    -  Suto H
    -  Inui Y
    -  Nishikawa S
    -  Okamura A
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