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Promoter methylation of human mutL homolog 1 and colorectal cancer risk: A meta-analysis


1 Combine Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine of Oncology, Henan Tumor Hospital, Henan, China
2 Department of Oncology, Henan Tumor Hospital, Zhengzhou 450008, Henan, China

Correspondence Address:
Qilong Gao,
No. 127 Dongming Road, Zhengzhou 450008, Henan
China
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None

Aims: Several studies suggested that promoter methylation of human mutL homolog 1 (hMLH1) was associated with the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). However, other studies did not indicate the same results. To derive a more comprehensive estimation of the association between hMLH1 methylation and CRC risk, we conducted a meta-analysis. Materials and Methods: We searched in the PubMed, EMBASE, and WanFang Medicine databases. The strength of the associations was measured by odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results: A total of 47 studies with 4296 cases and 2827 controls were included. A statistically significant association between hMLH1 methylation and CRC risk was found (OR = 9.25; 95% CI, 5.65-15.53; P < 0.001). The heterogeneity was significant (P < 0.001). In the subgroup analysis of race, Asian and Caucasian with hMLH1 methylation had increased CRC risk (OR = 12.19; 95% CI, 7.02-23.42; P < 0.001 and OR = 6.38; 95% CI, 2.17-19.64; P < 0.001). In the subgroup analysis of sample source, only the sample from tissue showed increased CRC risk (OR = 10.46; 95% CI, 6.12-17.90; P < 0.001). The Egger's test did not find publication bias (P = 0.176). Conclusions: In conclusion, this meta-analysis suggested that hMLH1 methylation was associated with an increased CRC risk.


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